International Studies Association annual meeting in Toronto

l will be at the International Studies Association annual meeting in Toronto, Ontario (Canada).

I am organizing a roundtable on Sociology and International Development (March 26th, 2014) at 8:15 AM in room Sheraton B at the Sheraton Centre Toronto. See abstract below.

I am also participating in an exchange about emerging economies. This panel is entitled “Peering into the MIST: Emerging Economies (e.g. Mexico, Indonesia, South Korea and Turkey) and the Geopolitical Order”. Join us at 10:30 AM in room Willow East at the Sheraton Centre Toronto. See abstract below.

“Sociology and International Development”
Chaired by Dimitri della Faille (Université du Québec en Outaouais)

ROUNDTABLE ABSTRACT

This roundtable will be an opportunity to discuss the unique contribution of sociology to understanding international development. Does sociology provide unique insight into international development that is distinguishable from other social science disciplines? What is the nature of the distinctive contribution, if any, of sociology? Does a sociological perspective involve distinct methodological, theoretical, and/or ideational approaches to the study of international development? Past, present and future sociological research on international development, its institutions, and its ideas will be discussed. We will also reflect on what needs to be done in order to increase the visibility and raise the profile of sociology in international studies and more specifically in the study of international development.

“Peering into the MIST: Emerging Economies (e.g. Mexico, Indonesia, South Korea and Turkey) and the Geopolitical Order
Chaired by Alan Bowman (Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada)

PANEL ABSTRACT

Emerging economies are expected to account for 70% of global economic growth within the next ten to fifteen years. While the upward growth trend in these countries is likely to continue, the days of startling growth rates across emerging markets may not last forever. Emerging economies may experience more volatility than the advanced industrial democracies in years to come. Additionally, not all emerging economies are created equal and many are at very different development stages and face their own set of particular issues and challenges. Moreover, while increasing economic clout has in some cases lead to a greater exercise of new-found weight in regional and multilateral affairs, in other cases it has neither led to an increased desire nor capacity to engage on broader global governance issues. Using examples from MIST countries, this roundtable will examine the influence of emerging economies in the geopolitical order.